Some food for thought

… on ways to achieve a low-carbon-diet. 

Since your choice of diet has a huge impact on planet earth, we’ve gathered some insights on how you can reduce your foodprint and have a low-carbon-diet.

Veggie or vegan

1. It might not be what your favorite fact, but did you know that avoiding meat and dairy is ‘the single biggest’ way to reduce your impact on earth?

Flexitarian

2. If it seems totally unfeasible, you can always become a flexitarian. As a species, they are way more common than vegans and vegetarians, often less frowned upon and might be even more important in terms of impact when we speak of ways to save the planet.

Foodprint

3. Whatever you decide to do diet wise, there are a few other things to keep in mind as well. Such as how much resources are needed to produce your food in terms of land, water, and so on. Some products demand more than others. We all have our favorites, and now you can calculate the footprint of yours with BBCs climate change food calculator. The avocado is an example. Although we love love, the footprint of this goodie is quite extensive. So much actually, that this UK café decided to stop serving it, highlighting how harmful the traveling miles and the environmental and social impact of the production process is.

Buy local

4. Speaking of traveling miles, always try to choose local food! It matters to reflect on how far the products you consume have traveled. This means that buying locally produced and seasonal food is both environmentally friendly and help support local farmers.

Reduce waste

5. One third of the food produced today is wasted, so making the most out of what we have is crucial. When cooking, save your leftovers in boxes in the freezer or cook juices for soups and sauces based on the cuttings. Too Good to Go has made the perfect platform for reducing food waste, offering customers to buy leftover food from restaurants and cafés to a reduced price. So far, they have saved more than 14 million portions of food from being wasted, equivalent to reducing more than 37000 tons of CO2.

Check out eatlowcarbon.org for more diet tips, carbon food scores and even a quiz to test your knowledge.